Saturday, 18 October 2014

THIS IS THE SHORT STORY OF THIS SITE

For those coming here and wondering what it's all about - well in a nutshell it's about this ebay scammer called Amir Tofangsazan who sold a broken laptop and thought he got away with it... 4 million site hits between this and the parent site (dormant for over a month now) and we're still waiting for the little toe sucker to make good. Probably the easiest way to understand things is to click on the picture on the left and see what Wikipedia has on him.....click on the big text to see the current Wikipedia stuff, anyway, I'm just trying to make this site as interesting as possible for daily visits until Amir raises his perverted thieving head again!
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LATEST, LATEST, LATEST UPDATE (thanks again to Von) link

link
LOOKS LIKE THE LITTLE THIEVING SHIT MOVED ONTO BIGGER SCAMS! - I'll try and get some more info but if any of you have a friendly journalist friend they can apply for the court documents here. Thanks to 'anonymous' for the tip. If you click on the earliest archive on the right you can get a good idea of what this guy was all about. He was even interviewed on BBC radio were he denied everything (it's somewhere in the archives). I for one am very happy he was denied bail and hope he goes to prison where his homo-erotic tendencies and foot fetishes will have another outlet.

Thursday, 17 April 2014

10am GEEK BITS








Enty








MAINSTREAM MEDIA NO LONGER INVESTIGATES




Media silence surrounding the BLM vs. Bundy ranch story is stunning
We all know media, as a whole, generally ignores stories that eventually prove massive wrongdoing within the rank and file of federal government. 
That said, the blackout of the Nevada land showdown takes it to a completely different level.
Why is this? 
What is being covered up and/or ignored here? 
Evidence is beginning to surface that shows America’s most powerful Senator may very well be right at the center of the Nevada land controversy. 
This isn’t a right vs. left issue. 
This isn’t a Republican vs. Democrat issue. 
This isn’t a tea party vs. occupy wall street issue. 
No, this is a government vs. the people it is supposed to protect issue. 
And the government’s part in this fight appears to be fueled by corruption and profit.




This is what happens when mainstream media is conglomerated, which became the trend 35 years ago.

Wednesday, 16 April 2014

CELEB CLASSICS








Does snowboarding get your pulse racing? Try doing it while carrying JET THRUSTERS: Gadget helps British rider set world record

  • Jamie Barrow used device to reach 50.1mph (80.63 kph) on a flat stretch
  • System uses 4 8-kW motors that spin fan blades at speeds of 30,000 rpm
  • Rider holds onto bar and controls thrust with thumb throttle or bite device
  • Adam Contoret, the inventor of the system, hopes the the thrusters will also be used to improve jump height and push riders up hills

As if snowboarding wasn’t enough of a rush, one British thrillseeker has decided to do the sport using electric jet thrusters.
Jamie Barrow, the UK’s fastest snowboarder, set a world record earlier this year using electric engines at the St Moritz resort in Switzerland.
The Swiss-born sportsman was able to reach a speed of 50.1mph (80.63 kph) on a flat stretch using nothing but the electric thrusters to propel him. 
Scroll down for video…
Jamie Barrow (pictured), the UK's fastest snowboarder, set a world record earlier this year using the electric engines at the St Moritz resort in Switzerland
Jamie Barrow (pictured), the UK's fastest snowboarder, set a world record earlier this year using the electric engines at the St Moritz resort in Switzerland
‘It might sound a bit crazy to begin with - "Oh yeah, I'm going to be propelled along by electric jet engines", said the University of Bath graduate.
‘But in reality, it's not as bad as it sounds. You're not going to take off and fly somewhere.’

    The jet engine record attempt began when Mr Barrow was contacted by Adam Contoret from Staffordshire-based DreamScience.
    Mr Contoret came up with the idea for the device after he tried his hand at paramotoring and found he didn't like the experience of strapping a huge engine on his back. 
    The jet engine record attempt began when Mr Barrow (pictured) was contacted by Adam Contoret from Staffordshire-based DreamScience
    The jet engine record attempt began when Mr Barrow (pictured) was contacted by Adam Contoret from Staffordshire-based DreamScience

    HOW DOES THE DEVICE WORK?

    Dreamscience said recent advances in lithium polymer battery technology have made it  possible to power four eight-kW motors.
    These each turn spin fan blades at speeds of up to 30,000 rpm. 
    To use the device, the rider holds onto the central bar and controls thrust with either a thumb throttle or bite control.
    Adam Contoret, the inventor of the device, hopes the the thrusters will also be used to improve jump height and push riders up hills.
    'It's like a jet on a runway,’ he said. ‘It seems slow at first and before you know it you're just going like a rocket.'
    He decided to develop his own thrust system that could be used by skiers, windsurfers, skater and snowboarders .
    ‘The thruster is a very powerful motor driving a fan, about 30,000 rpm,’ Mr Contoret told Gizmag.com.
    ‘A modern jet engine has a turbojet propulser module at the core of the engine and this drives a large fan at the front of the engine that generates most of the thrust.
    ‘Electric motor technology has recently progressed to the level where the turbojet core can be replaced with a high power electric motor.’
    Dreamscience’s latest prototype uses a four 8 kW motor-powered thrusters, along with a lithium-polymer battery pack to power the motors.
    To use the device, the rider holds onto the central bar and controls thrust with either a thumb throttle or bite control.
    Dreamscience said recent advances in lithium polymer battery technology has made it  possible to power four eight-kW motors. These each turn spin fan blades at speeds of up to 30,000 rpm
    Dreamscience said recent advances in lithium polymer battery technology has made it possible to power four eight-kW motors. These each turn spin fan blades at speeds of up to 30,000 rpm
    To use the device, the rider holds onto the central bar and controls thrust with either a thumb throttle or bite control
    To use the device, the rider holds onto the central bar and controls thrust with either a thumb throttle or bite control
    The world record, by Jamie Barrow, was set on a frozen lake at St Moritz resort in Switzerland. The Swiss-born sportman was able to reach a speed of 50.1mph (80.63 kph) on a flat stretch using nothing but the electric thrusters to propel him
    The world record, by Jamie Barrow, was set on a frozen lake at St Moritz resort in Switzerland. The Swiss-born sportman was able to reach a speed of 50.1mph (80.63 kph) on a flat stretch using nothing but the electric thrusters to propel him
    Mr Contoret hopes the the thrusters will also be used to improve jump height and push riders up hills.
    'It's like a jet on a runway,’ he said. ‘It seems slow at first and before you know it you're just going like a rocket.
    ‘I see devices like this becoming extreme sport devices to get up skiers up slopes and to go wind surfing when there’s no wind.’
    While the device isn’t currently on sale, Dreamscience said it estimates a future retail price to be around $5,000 (£3,000) and $10,000 (£5,970).
    Adam Contoret, the inventor of the device, hopes the the thrusters will also be used to improve jump height and push riders up hills. It could also be used by skaters, surfers and skiers
    Adam Contoret, the inventor of the device, hopes the the thrusters will also be used to improve jump height and push riders up hills. It could also be used by skaters, surfers and skiers
    While the device isn't currently on sale, Dreamscience said it estimates a future retail price to be around $5,000 (£3,000) and $10,000 (£5,970)
    While the device isn't currently on sale, Dreamscience said it estimates a future retail price to be around $5,000 (£3,000) and $10,000 (£5,970)

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    The Many Varieties of Whiskey
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    From the Ford Mustang to colonies on the moon: Predictions that the 1964 World's Fair got right... and what it got very wrong


    The New York World's Fair of 1964 introduced 51 million visitors to a range of technological innovations and predictions during its run. Fifty years later, some of those ideas have turned out to be commonplace in our world. Others? Not so much.
    WHAT THEY HAD WRONG
    Colonies on the moon, underwater and in Antarctica
    The 'Futurama 2' ride from General Motors, which featured images of people living in places where they clearly, uh, don't.
    Habitats of the future: This installation of an imagined underwater colony was part of General Motors' Futurama 2 ride at the 1964 World's Fair in Queens, New York
    Habitats of the future: This installation of an imagined underwater colony was part of General Motors' Futurama 2 ride at the 1964 World's Fair in Queens, New York
    For the men who lived on the moon? Also on the Futurama 2 ride at the 1964 World's Fair was this prediction of what a lunar colony might look like
    For the men who lived on the moon? Also on the Futurama 2 ride at the 1964 World's Fair was this prediction of what a lunar colony might look like
    Paved-over rainforests
    Another image from 'Futurama 2' featured a machine that used a laser to cut through the rainforests and left behind paved roads.
    Jet packs
    There were demonstrations of jet pack power at the fair, with men wearing them and zooming around the grounds. Sadly, they remain a mode of transport found mainly in science fiction.

      WHAT THEY HAD RIGHT
      Picturephone
      Bell System introduced this innovation, which allowed people to see whom they were calling. It didn't go over well at the time, but it's a concept that's an everyday part of our lives now in apps such as Skype and Facetime.
      Talking face-to-face: A Picturephone is demonstrated at the AT&T Pavilion at the 1964 World's Fair
      Talking face-to-face: A Picturephone is demonstrated at the AT&T Pavilion at the 1964 World's Fair
      Personal use of the computer
      Several pavilions had exhibits set up where visitors could ask computers for information and get responses in seconds.
      Robotics
      Walt Disney's 'It's a Small World' exhibit introduced robotic animation in which characters sing, speak and make lifelike gestures such as smiles and blinks. It's still in use in theme parks and movies today.
      Capturing imaginations: Visitors at the It's a Small World attraction at the 1964 World's Fair
      Capturing imaginations: Visitors at the It's a Small World attraction at the 1964 World's Fair
      Small scale, big future: Walt Disney is seen presenting a model of Disney's It's a Small World attraction from the 1964 New York World's Fair
      Small scale, big future: Walt Disney is seen presenting a model of Disney's It's a Small World attraction from the 1964 New York World's Fair
      Ford Mustang
      The two-seater sports car with its long hood and short rear deck was officially unveiled at the World's Fair and immediately became popular. It has remained in production ever since.
      Hot wheels: The Ford Mustang, with its long hood and short rear deck, was officially unveiled at the World's Fair
      Hot wheels: The Ford Mustang, with its long hood and short rear deck, was officially unveiled at the World's Fair
      Touch-tone phones
      Originally introduced at the Seattle World's Fair in 1962, this was still the first time many visitors were exposed to this technology.

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